Annotated Biblography and Works Cited

PRIMARY SOURCES:

Byron, Ada. “Selections from Ada’s Notes.” Agnes Scott College . Toole, Betty Alexandra, n.d. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. <http://www.agnesscott.edu/lriddle/women/ada-love.htm>.

             This publisher is very interested and educated on the life of Ada Lovelace, as many articles about Ada have been written by her. This article is followed by the notes written by Ada herself, as she recorded her experimentation with the Analytical Engine. Her notes display her sincere dedication towards this computing program. This is very reliable information since it was written by the scientist herself, and it gives her audience a picture of how much effort she put into the creation of the Analytical Engine. 

Douglass, Frederick. “The Countess of Lovelace.” Accessible Archives.  African American Newspapers, 23 Jan. 1853. Web. 10Sept.2011.<http://www.accessible.com/accessible/print?AADocList=5&AADocStyle=STYLED&AAStyleFile=&AABeanName=toc1&AANextPage=/printFullDocFromXML.jsp&AACheck=1.900.5.0.5>.

This primary source coming from the London Inquirer does a respectable job of giving a brief background on Ada Byron’s life but it is very vague and does not adequately highlight any of her accomplishments. It was disappointing that this being one of the few primary sources found on Ada, it included many pieces of irrelevant information, such as the “softness and darkness” of her hair. This source would not be recommended for any type of serious research on this woman scientist. 

SECONDARY SOURCES:

Moore, Doris Langley. “Ada Lovelace: Founder of Scientific Computing.” San Diego Supercomputer Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/lovelace.html>.

This source focused on her mother’s influence on her career, something none of the other sources really touched on. While most mothers in this era did not push their daughters towards any career field, Ada’s mother pushed her towards her education and even took her to collaborate with Mr. Babbage. Influential people in a scientist’s life are very important to be aware of because it gives the audience an insight on how the scientists were able to have the confidence to come about with their research.


Green, Christopher D. “Classics in the History of Psychology:Lovelace (1843).”Sketch of the Analytical Engine. N.p.Web. 10 Sept. 2011.<http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Lovelace/lovelace.htm >

This source goes in detail about the math required for the Analytical Engine. The presented information is the work of both Babbage and Byron in the path of making the Analytical Engine happen. Ada Byron also worked as a translator for Babbage, so all the research for the program was translated by her. This source is very informative for those wanting to understand how the Analytical Engine works, but does not include any biographical information.


Freeman, Elisabeth. “Ada and the Analytical Engine.” Educom Review. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. <http://net.educause.edu/apps/er/review/reviewArticles/31240.html

    This was the most detailed source I was able to find. Rather than being strictly a biography, this article gave in-depth information on how Ada Byron really contributed to the creation of the Analytical Engine. Without her, Babbage would have been unable to bring this idea to life and explain its uses to the outside world. While other sources merely mentioned Byron was the first female computer programmer, this article explained how she was able to do so without severe sexism.

 

Stansfier, Ryan . “Augusta Ada Byron.” Florida Institute of Technology. N.p., 24 Aug. 2004. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. <cs.fit.edu/~ryan/ada/lovelace.html>.

              This source highlighted the main points in Ada Byron’s life. A piece of relevant information obtained from this website was the dedication Ada had put in order to gain the attention from Babbage. Once he saw how hard she was trying to get his attention, he realized how talented she really was. This resource would have been very good, but it is lacking in-depth information.

 

Moore, Doris Langley. “Ada Lovelace: Founder of Scientific Computing.” San Diego Supercomputer Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/lovelace.html>.

              This source focused on her mother’s influence on her career, something none of the other sources really touched on. While most mothers in this era did not push their daughters towards any career field, Ada’s mother pushed her towards her education and even took her to collaborate with Mr. Babbage. Influential people in a scientist’s life are very important to be aware of because it gives the audience an insight on how the scientists were able to have the confidence to come about with their research

 

PRESENTATION WORKS CITED:

Swade, Doron. The Difference Engine: Charles Babbage and the Quest   to Build the First Computer. New York: Viking, 2000.

Babbage, Charles (1791 – 1871). (2002). In The Cambridge Dictionary of   Scientists. Retrieved from   http://www.credoreference.com/entry/dicscientist/babbag  e_charles_1791_1871


Moore, Doris Langley. “Ada Lovelace: Founder of Scientific   Computing.” 
San Diego Supercomputer Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 11   Sept. 2011.   <http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/lovelace.html>.

“Current Statistics for Women in Computing.” CSSU | Computer Science Student   Union. Web. 25 Oct. 2011. <http://www.cssu-  bg.org/WomeninCS/current_statistics.php>.

Green, Christopher D. “Classics in the History of Psychology:Lovelace (1843).”Sketch of the Analytical Engine. N.p.Web. 10 Sept. 2011.

<http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Lovelace/lovelace.htm >

Stansfier, Ryan . “Augusta Ada Byron.” Florida Institute of Technology. N.p., 24 Aug. 2004. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. <cs.fit.edu/~ryan/ada/lovelace.html>.

Moore, Doris Langley. “Ada Lovelace: Founder of Scientific Computing.” San Diego Supercomputer Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Sept. 2011. <http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/lovelace.html>.

Freeman, Elisabeth. “Ada and the Analytical Engine.” EducomReview. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. <http://net.educause.edu/apps/er/review/reviewArticles/31240.html>.

Douglass, Frederick. “The Countess of Lovelace.” Accessible Archives.  African American Newspapers, 23 Jan. 1853. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. <http://www.accessible.com/accessible/print?AADocList=5&AADocStyle=STYLED&AAStyleFile=&AABeanName=toc1&AANextPage=/printFullDocFromXML.jsp&AACheck=1.900.5.0.5>.

Byron, Ada. “Selections from Ada’s Notes.” Agnes Scott College . Toole, Betty Alexandra, n.d. Web. 10 Sept. 2011. http://www.agnesscott.edu/lriddle/women/ada-love.htm>.

 http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php?id=298

“About BPW Foundation.” Business and Professional Women’s   Foundation. Web. 12 Nov. 2011.   <http://www.bpwfoundation.org/index.php/about/>.

“Business and Professional Women’s Foundation.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 13 Nov. 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_and_Professional_Women’s_Foundation>.


 


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